Girl Making Brazilian Flag On Face During Brazilian Independence Day Celebration

Adriana Janeri, Manager, Training and Development, is a multi-lingual traveler who trains clinical research associates (CRA) all across Latin America. This September 7, she will join her fellow Brazilians in celebrating Dia da Independência—the day Brazil declared its independence from Portugal after being colonized in 1500.

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Adriana Janeri, Manager, Training and Development, is a multi-lingual traveler who trains clinical research associates (CRA) all across Latin America. We spoke with her about Dia da Independência—the day Brazil declared its independence from Portugal after being colonized in 1500.

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Samantha Mineroff
Samantha Mineroff
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Nick Tate
Nick Tate
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Adriana Janeri
Adriana Janeri, Manager, Training and Development

Adriana Janeri, Manager, Training and Development, is a multi-lingual traveler who trains clinical research associates (CRA) all across Latin America. This September 7, she will join her fellow Brazilians in celebrating Dia da Independência—the day Brazil declared its independence from Portugal after being colonized in 1500.

“Brazil is the only country that was colonized by Portugal in Latin America. That's why we speak both Portuguese and Spanish,” Adriana explains. “Sometimes this is confusing for people from abroad—they think that we’re Spanish speakers and we’re not, although we try to attend classes to learn more.”

In 1808, Brazil’s royal family lived in Brazil, fleeing the French during a time of war. They ran Brazil as a monarchy, which created separations in political views. In the years when Dom João VI (the king) remained in Brazil, manifestations of nativism were observed, with the Pernambuco’s Revolution of 1817 being the main one due to a disagreement of the Monarchial absolutism ideas. These ideas were no longer accepted by the majority of citizens, including Dom Pedro (Prince Pedro). Adriana explains that, “At the end of 1821, the royal family was demanded to go back to Portugal. However, Dom Pedro did not agree with what was happening and didn’t want to return to Europe. He stayed and organized the Brazilian people’s independence.”

January 9, 1822, known as Dia Do Fico, or “Stay Day,” is the day the prince refused to return to Portugal. “He declared that he would stay and not return to Portugal until he had resolved all the issues here in Brazil,” says Adriana. Prince Pedro then spent months running the county.

On September 7, at the shore of the Ipiranga River, he cried the famous Ipiranga cry (Grito do Ipiranga), where he shouted “Independencia ou Morte" (Independence or Death), and marched to declare Brazil’s independence from Portugal.

Adriana explains that, “Even though the story sounds pretty, it still took about three years until we became fully independent in 1825. Still, we consider the 7th of September the most important day for our country. Kids are often asked to sing Brazilian Hymn before starting class and learn about the Ipiranga cry.”

Brazil's Independence Day Parade

Brazil also celebrates with a famous parade and fireworks at the capital. Adriana says, “The most famous thing on that day is an air show, where the aircraft fly overhead with beautiful smoke trails and everyone cheers!” The president makes an appearance to offer positive words that empower Brazilian citizens. Millions of people watch the parade on TV.

Different regions of Brazil celebrate Dia da Independência differently, due to the fact that more southern areas of the country were colonized by Germany and Italy. “People in those regions host special parades and bring back their origins. In the North, we have a specific parade—not Carnival, which is what many people imagine first. The costumes are different and we regard different nationalities. We have many people from different regions—Japan, Italy, Germany, and more. Every group in every part of the country. They celebrate the day in different and specific ways,” says Adriana.

When we see the importance of heritage on days like Dia da Independência, we can translate these sentiments into other areas of our work. Adriana’s role as a National Manager of Training Development allows her to travel and work with people from all over Latin America, including Mexico, Columbia, Peru, Chile, Argentina, and Guatemala.

“We complete trainings across all of these countries, not just for a specific sponsor but to disseminate information to everyone inside our company. This ensures quality of work and compliance with different clients across Latin America,” says Adriana. “We train experienced CRAs in oncology monitoring and through the CRA Bridge program, we train inexperienced people who want to become CRAs.”

Our 900+ staff in Latin America provide services throughout region such as clinical study/supply management, launch planning, medical writing, contracts management, regulatory, training, data management, and biostatistics.

Learn more about our work in Latin America.

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