Global Voices: Celebrating the Mid-Autumn Festival with Vicky Qu

October 1st marks the Mid-Autumn Festival, an important Chinese festival that traditionally falls on the 15th day of the eighth lunar month. Vicky Qu, Head of China, Hongkong, and Taiwan Talent Acquisition is based in our Shanghai office, where she’ll be celebrating this cultural holiday. Vicky shared with us her insights about the event, her work at PRA, and the expertise she and her team have for recruiting top talent in the area.

Key Highlights

We spoke with Vicky Qu, Head of China, Hongkong, and Taiwan Talent Acquisition about the historical significance of the Mid-Autumn Festival, what it personally means to her, and how COVID-19 is impacting this year’s celebrations. Vicky shared her insights about her work for PRA and the expertise she and her team have for recruiting top talent in the area.

Tweet
Samantha Mineroff
Samantha Mineroff
Copywriter
Nick Tate
Nick Tate
Copywriter

“This holiday takes its name from the fact that it’s always celebrated in the middle of the autumn season,” explains Vicky. “The day is also known as the Moon Festival because it’s the time of the year when the moon is at its roundest and brightest.” The festival also occurs during the time of year when fruits, vegetables, and grains are harvested.

“The Mid-Autumn Festival celebrations date back more than 2,000 years,” Vicky explains. “The word ‘Mid-Autumn’ first appeared in the famous ancient book Zhou Li.” However, it was not until the early Tang Dynasty that the day was officially celebrated as a traditional festival. Vicky says, “It became an established festival during the Song Dynasty and has become as popular as the Spring Festival since the Ming and Qing dynasties.” Celebrations since then have expanded.

Vicky notes that this holiday entails evening celebrations where families gather together to light lanterns (which is unfortunately now banned in megacities like Shanghai and Beijing due to fire risks), eat moon cakes, and appreciate the round moon. “The full moon is a symbol for family reunion, which is why that day is also known as the Festival of Reunion,” says Vicky.

20200923 PRA Dalian office mid autumn 4
Lantern

Vicky personally celebrates with her family, who gather together for dinner and watch the Mid-Autumn Festival evening party on TV. She eats traditional foods including taro, duck, hairy crab, and more. Normally, she and her family would also take a short trip to enjoy the festival in person, but due to COVID-19, this may not happen this year.

“My family is all in Shanghai, so we’ll be able to gather and celebrate. But we can’t go on a far-away trip,” she says.

Vicky is the Association Director of Talent Acquisition for China, Taiwan, and Hongkong. She and her coworkers will celebrate in the office for the Mid-Autumn festival. For Shanghai, the festival is scheduled for the afternoon of September 23. There also be a celebration held in the Beijing and Taipei offices.

In Vicky’s current capacity, she leads the full spectrum of talent acquisition functions for China, Taiwan and Hongkong. PRA’s operations in this region partner together with respective stakeholders to generate success.

PRA’s recruiters have substantial experience recruiting across China, Hongkong, and Taiwan in a broad spectrum of functional areas, including clinical operations and biometrics. The team leverages a series of core recruitment strategies to identify resources. They search for candidates equipped with the necessary experience to support the functional and therapeutic area requirements of our diverse needs, including niche and highly specialized experience requirements.

Talk to one of our recruiters—you’ll see what we mean when we say that working here is different.

Read more

You may also be interested in: