As we move into the first full week of May, 2020. We bring you the latest non-COVID-19 related news stories from around the Life Sciences Industry. This is Industry Watch.

Highlights include: Biologists studying collectives of bacteria, or "biofilms," have discovered that these so-called simple organisms feature a robust capacity for memory; Scientists have identified the facial features of patients with cancer using the deep learning technique; A drug already licensed to treat some breast and ovarian cancers has been found to be effective for some men with advanced prostate cancer; Seattle Children’s Hospital have developed the nation’s first “opioid-free” surgery center. Read these and more below:

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Seattle Children’s Develops Nation’s First Opioid-Free” Surgery Center

Seattle Children’s Develops Nation’s First Opioid-Free” Surgery Center

Seattle Children’s Hospital at its Bellevue Clinic and Surgery Center (BCSC) has developed the nation’s first-ever “opioid-free” surgery center. The “opioid-free” surgery center leverages MDmetrix’s artificial intelligence (AI)-driven technology empowering medical leaders and frontline clinicians to visualize, evaluate, and monitor clinical and workflow outcomes.

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DNA blood test spots cancers in seemingly cancer-free women, but also produces false alarms

DNA blood test spots cancers in seemingly cancer-free women, but also produces false alarms

This week a pioneering real-world study confirms some of the promise of being able to use a simple blood test for DNA shed by tumor cells, to detect cancer early.

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New Type of Immune Cell Discovered in Breast Ducts

New Type of Immune Cell Discovered in Breast Ducts

Melbourne breast cancer researchers have discovered a new type of immune cell that helps to keep breast tissue healthy by regulating a vital process within mammary ducts—the sites where milk is produced and transported, but also where most breast cancers arise.

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They remember: Communities of microbes found to have working memory

They remember: Communities of microbes found to have working memory

Biologists studying collectives of bacteria, or "biofilms," have discovered that these so-called simple organisms feature a robust capacity for memory. It was found that found that bacterial cells stimulated with light remembered the exposure hours after the initial stimulus. The researchers were able to manipulate the process so that memory patterns emerged.

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Identification of the Facial Features of Patients With Cancer: A Deep Learning–Based Pilot Study

Identification of the Facial Features of Patients With Cancer: A Deep Learning–Based Pilot Study

Cancer has become the second leading cause of death globally. Most cancer cases are due to genetic mutations, which affect metabolism and result in facial changes. In this study, the researchers aimed to identify the facial features of patients with cancer using the deep learning technique.

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Neural circuit that drives physical responses to emotional stress discovered

Neural circuit that drives physical responses to emotional stress discovered

Researchers at Nagoya University have discovered a neural circuit that drives physical responses to emotional stress. The circuit begins in deep brain areas, called the dorsal peduncular cortex and the dorsal tenia tecta (DP/DTT), that send stress signals to the hypothalamus, a small region in the brain that controls the body’s vital functions.

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New targets for childhood brain tumors identified

New targets for childhood brain tumors identified

People with the genetic condition neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) are prone to developing tumors on nervous system tissue. A new study has found that the development and growth of such tumors are driven by nearby noncancerous neurons and immune cells. The findings point to potential new therapeutic targets for people with NF1.

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