In the first week of July we bring you news of research into the use of ultrasound to treat conditions such as depression, migraine, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

There are also further developments in the CNS field with the study of deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease; a patient perspective on juvenile arthritis, and the mental health toll on those with a dual diagnosis of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis; news of a potential end to the Ebola pandemic which has been ongoing in the Democratic Republic of the Congo for 23 months; a visual understanding of the coronavirus; and a study on the benefits of exercise for children who are breast-fed.

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Aiming Ultrasound at the Brain Raises Hope of New Treatments

Aiming Ultrasound at the Brain Raises Hope of New Treatments

As a way to see inside the body, revealing a tumor or a fetus, ultrasound is tried and true. But neuroscientists have a newer ambition for the technology: tinkering with the brain. At frequencies lower than those of a sonogram but still beyond the range of human hearing, ultrasound can penetrate the skull and boost or suppress brain activity. If researchers can prove that ultrasound safely and predictably changes human brain function, it could become a powerful, noninvasive research tool and a new means of treating brain disorders.

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Disconnect Amid Dual Diagnosis: Managing the Mental Toll of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis

Disconnect Amid Dual Diagnosis: Managing the Mental Toll of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis

The gap between patient-reported outcomes and clinician-assessed endpoints in rheumatology is well documented. Patients generally care about pain, fatigue and the emotional toll immune-mediated diseases can take, while physicians are more likely to pay attention to interleukin activity or C-reactive protein levels. This disconnect can be seen most clearly in patients with both psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. When a patient has both diagnoses, that disconnect can lead to quality of life comorbidities for patients and create uphill battles for clinicians.

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Second Deadliest Ebola Outbreak Ever is Days from Being Declared Over

Second Deadliest Ebola Outbreak Ever is Days from Being Declared Over

The North Kivu-Ituri epidemic, named after the two provinces in eastern DRC where it has raged, is the second longest and second deadliest in history. If, as fervently hoped, Congolese authorities announce that Ebola has been vanquished there during this week, the outbreak will have lasted nearly 23 months.

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A Strong Voice for Young People with Arthritis

A Strong Voice for Young People with Arthritis

Adam Hooda's symptoms started at age 7, his parents becoming aware of a difference in his range of mobility and gait, mainly during his much-loved dance classes. For 7 years Adam and his family hoped for a diagnosis that could explain this change, and his discomfort and pain. Diagnoses ranged from growing pains to vitamin deficiencies and sports injuries. Not only were the social and physical developmental stages of Adam's childhood affected—limitations in peer-interaction or missing out on simple play—there were also years of uncertainty around Adam's health, and no one could tell them why.

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A Visual Guide to the SARS-CoV-2 Coronavirus

A Visual Guide to the SARS-CoV-2 Coronavirus

For all the mysteries that remain about the novel coronavirus and the COVID-19 disease it causes, scientists have generated an incredible amount of fine-grained knowledge in a surprisingly short time.

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Landmark Study Finds Deep Brain Stimulation Slows Parkinson’s Progression

Landmark Study Finds Deep Brain Stimulation Slows Parkinson’s Progression

New data chronicling the long-term effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on early-stage Parkinson’s disease patients has found the treatment significantly slows its progression. Researchers from Vanderbilt University Medical Center suggest, if the results are validated in a large Phase 3 trial currently underway, DBS will become the first therapy clinically proven to slow the progression of this neurodegenerative disease.

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Benefits of Exercise Could be Passed Through Breast Milk, says New Study

Benefits of Exercise Could be Passed Through Breast Milk, says New Study

If you’re trying for or expecting a baby it’s very likely you’ll have been recommended special diets, exercise regimes and a reading list as long as your arm offering hints and tips on how to improve the health of your baby. While exercise during pregnancy is generally recommended to upkeep the health of parents, staying active during and after pregnancy may pass along a lifetime of health benefits to your baby through breast milk. A new study found that moderate exercise during and after pregnancy increases a compound in breast milk that reduces a baby’s lifelong risks of serious health issues like diabetes, obesity and heart disease.

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