In the third week of March, Industry Watch brings you research into why food allergies could become a thing of the past through use of allergen immunotherapy, anti-IgE drugs, and allergy vaccines. We’re also looking at neuroscience with insights into the role of the microbiome in combatting disorders of the brain; and pre-clinical dementia. In COVID-19 there’s news this week which further highlights the need for better understanding of long COVID, as it is now understood younger women are more likely to suffer symptoms for longer than men after a hospital stay. As well as an insightful piece on the current known coronavirus variants. In digital health, we’re covering the promise of medical AI and how it can be utilized in the practice of clinical medicine and healthcare operations.

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Food Allergies Could Soon Become a Thing of the Past – Here's Why

Food Allergies Could Soon Become a Thing of the Past – Here's Why

Food allergies have been on the rise. In the US, it is now estimated that over 10 per cent of the adult population has an allergy to peanuts, shellfish, dairy or another food. In the UK, the past three decades have seen hospital admissions for food allergies rise fivefold. Thankfully, we are building up the armory needed to reverse this trend so that, one day, such potentially deadly reactions become a thing of the past.

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Tool to Modify Sugars on "Undruggable" Proteins may Uncover New Treatments

Tool to Modify Sugars on "Undruggable" Proteins may Uncover New Treatments

Sugars found on cells, such as O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc), are notoriously difficult to study. Current tools act by either turning on or off all the O-GlcNAc sugars in a cell or by turning on or off a single sugar on one amino acid on one protein. These techniques do not offer insight on what O-GlcNAc molecules are doing to a protein as a whole, which is necessary information to connect O-GlcNAc to disease.A new pencil and eraser tool can examine how sugars affect proteins by adding or removing the sugar with no off-target effects.

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Young Women ‘Five Times More Likely Than Men’ to Suffer Covid Symptoms Months after Hospital Stay

Young Women ‘Five Times More Likely Than Men’ to Suffer Covid Symptoms Months after Hospital Stay

Younger female patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19 are five times more likely than their male counterparts to still be suffering with symptoms seven months after their onset, early research suggests. Preliminary results from an ongoing study in the UK also found that this cohort, women and girls aged 50 and under, were also five times more likely than men to report a new disability in the months that followed their release from hospital.

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The Time is Right to Focus on Pre-Clinical Dementia

The Time is Right to Focus on Pre-Clinical Dementia

Researchers have long recognized the value of treating dementia in its “pre-clinical” phase. But it is difficult to conduct clinical studies in people with few or no symptoms. To do so, you need reliable tests to detect pre-clinical dementia and you need to monitor the effects of the treatments being tested.

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How the Gut Microbiome is Inspiring New Approaches to Treating Brain Disorders

How the Gut Microbiome is Inspiring New Approaches to Treating Brain Disorders

In recent years, abnormalities in the gut microbiome have been tied to a range of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease. Now, researchers at Baylor College of Medicine have preclinical evidence that some symptoms caused by complex brain diseases might be able to be treated with microbe-based therapies like probiotics.

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Coronavirus Variants and Mutations

Coronavirus Variants and Mutations

Each coronavirus contains nearly 30,000 letters of RNA. This genetic information allows the virus to infect cells and hijack them to make new viruses. As an infected cell builds new coronaviruses, it occasionally makes tiny copying errors called mutations. Scientists can track mutations as they are passed down through a lineage, which is a branch of the viral family tree.

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More Intelligent Medicine

More Intelligent Medicine

Improving the speed and accuracy of clinical diagnosis, augmenting clinical decision-making, reducing human error in clinical care, individualizing therapies based on a patient’s genomic profiles. These are some of the promises that physicians and researchers look to fulfill using AI.

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