In the first week of May Industry Watch is looking at the treatment options currently available for Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and where treatment gaps exist. Also in neuroscience there’s a story on the discovery of a new cell type which may contribute to better understanding of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). On the theme of better understanding of diseases, we’re covering the intersection between cardiovascular conditions and the liver, diabetes, and dementia; as well as COVID-19 and the gut. In addition, there’s news of a partnership to develop global data standards for rare diseases, and insights into one of the greatest achievements in scientific history – the discovery of penicillin.

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Approvals for Multiple Sclerosis Highlight Treatment Shortfalls

Approvals for Multiple Sclerosis Highlight Treatment Shortfalls

While the EU saw rapid-fire approvals in the multiple sclerosis space last month, the innovations centered mostly on improving existing approaches. Which areas of multiple sclerosis treatment need more options?

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CDISC and NORD Announce Partnership to Develop Global Data Standards for Rare Diseases

CDISC and NORD Announce Partnership to Develop Global Data Standards for Rare Diseases

CDISC and the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) have announced a partnership to develop global data standards for rare diseases. The data standards will be released in a Therapeutic Area User Guide that will be available at no cost on the CDISC website for researchers to leverage in studies to maximize data’s full potential.

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Insights into How COVID Outsmarts the Gut's Immune Response Could Point to New Treatments

Insights into How COVID Outsmarts the Gut's Immune Response Could Point to New Treatments

Scientists studying SARS-CoV-2, the virus behind COVID-19, have known since the early days of the pandemic that it can infect the stomach. But how the gut mounts an immune response to the virus is still largely a mystery.

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High Blood Pressure Suggested as Link Between Diabetes and Dementia

High Blood Pressure Suggested as Link Between Diabetes and Dementia

Researchers have long detected higher rates of dementia in people with type 2 diabetes. New findings from Imperial College London are offering clues to why that may be the case, indicating that cardiometabolic factors associated with diabetes, such as increased blood pressure, could be contributing to the development of dementia.

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New Type of Cell Contributes to Increased Understanding of ALS

New Type of Cell Contributes to Increased Understanding of ALS

The causes of the serious muscle disease ALS still remain unknown. Now, researchers have examined a type of cell in the brain blood vessels that could explain the unpredictable disease origins and dynamics. The results indicate a hitherto unknown connection between the nervous and vascular systems. The study has potential implications for earlier diagnoses and future treatments.

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Intersection Between Heart and Liver ‘a Rapidly Evolving Field’

Intersection Between Heart and Liver ‘a Rapidly Evolving Field’

About 25% of U.S. adults have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, which is the most common chronic liver condition in the U.S., according to the American Liver Foundation.

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, known as NAFLD, can progress to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which is a leading indication for liver transplant. Surprisingly, most patients with NAFLD die of CVD, not liver disease.

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Penicillin Was Not Alexander Fleming's First Major Discovery

Penicillin Was Not Alexander Fleming's First Major Discovery

The development of COVID vaccines has spotlighted the ingenuity of 21st-century science. In a matter of months, researchers pinpointed the coronavirus’s spike protein, figured out how to provoke an immune response and produced vaccine candidates for trial. The inoculation, in its several forms, is being hailed as one of the greatest achievements in scientific history.

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